Uncommon Type : Some Stories

Some Stories

Tom Hanks

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Beschreibung

A collection of seventeen wonderful short stories showing that two-time Oscar winner Tom Hanks is as talented a writer as he is an actor.

A gentle Eastern European immigrant arrives in New York City after his family and his life have been torn apart by his country's civil war. A man who loves to bowl rolls a perfect game--and then another and then another and then many more in a row until he winds up ESPN's newest celebrity, and he must decide if the combination of perfection and celebrity has ruined the thing he loves. An eccentric billionaire and his faithful executive assistant venture into America looking for acquisitions and discover a down and out motel, romance, and a bit of real life. These are just some of the tales Tom Hanks tells in this first collection of his short stories. They are surprising, intelligent, heartwarming, and, for the millions and millions of Tom Hanks fans, an absolute must-have!

"It turns out that Tom Hanks is also a wise and hilarious writer with an endlessly surprising mind. Damn it."
-Steve Martin

"The central quality to Tom's writing is a kind of poignant playfulness. It's exactly what you hope from him, except you wish he were sitting in your home, reading it aloud to you, one story at a time."
-Mindy Kaling

"Wait-Tom Hanks can write, too? Funny, moving, deftly surprising stories? That's just swell. Maybe there's no crying in baseball, pal, but it's perfectly acceptable in the book business. That's how we drown envy."
-Carl Hiaasen

"Mr. Hanks turns out to be as authentically genuine a Writer with as capital a W as ever touched a typewriter key. The stories in UNCOMMON TYPE range from the hilarious to the deeply touching. They move in period, location and manner, but all demonstrate a joy in writing, a pleasure in communicating an intensely American sense of atmosphere, friendship, life and family that is every bit as smart, engaging and humane as the man himself. All with that extra quality of keenly observant and sympathetic intelligence that has always set Tom Hanks apart. I blink, bubble and boggle in amazed admiration."
-Stephen Fry

"Uncommon Type is funny, wise, gloriously inventive and humane. Tom Hanks sees inside people - a wary divorcee, a billionaire trading desire for disaster, a boy witnessing his father's infidelity, a motley crew shooting for the moon - with such acute empathy and good humour we'd follow him anywhere. The cumulative effect is of a world I didn't want to leave."
-Anna Funder

"Reading Tom Hanks's Uncommon Type is like finding out that Alice Munro is also the greatest actress of our time."
-Ann Patchett

"Seventeen wide-ranging and whimsical stories-with a typewriter tucked into each one. Only one of the stories in Hanks' debut features an actor: it's a sharp satire with priceless insider details about a handsome dope on a press junket in Europe. The other 16 span a surprisingly wide spectrum...Hanks can write the hell out of typing, and his dialogue is excellent, too. Has he read William Saroyan? He should. While these stories have the all-American sweetness, humor, and heart we associate with his screen roles, Hanks writes like a writer, not a movie star."
-Kirkus Reviews

"Uncommon Type offers heartfelt charm along with nostalgia for sweeter, simpler times - even if they never really were quite so sweet or simple... Even when Hanks writes about somber subjects like the durable distress of combat or the high stakes for immigrants fleeing persecution, he finds a sweet spot."
-NPR

"Ultimately if you like Tom Hanks - and who doesn't? - you will enjoy Uncommon Type."
-AM New York

"In Uncommon Type, Hanks proves his bona fides as a serious scribe, producing a collection of 17 short stories so accomplished and delightful he can rest assured he has a great fallback plan should that acting thing, you know, not work out... Terrific, Tom."
-USA Today

"There is often a powerful sense of other lives imagined at a level that goes deeper than writerly research."
-The Guardian

"Enjoyable..."The Past Is Important to Us" employs a sharp, unexpected conclusion to elevate a story of time travel and romance at the 1939 World's Fair."
-Publisher's Weekly

"They're all beautifully written and full of heart."
-Sunday Mirror, The People

"Hanks can write. These pieces, some of which feature recurring characters and many of which explore the classic American short story territory of small-town life, have the authentic, worn-in feel of a favourite pair of jeans."
-Metro

"The great strengths of this collection are decency and sentimentality."
-Sunday Times

"Playful, perceptive and rewarding."
-Sunday Express

"An entertaining collection."
-Mail on Sunday

"impressive."
-The Sun

"There always comes a slight wariness when we discover that someone who is generally renowned for one thing turns out to be very good at something else..

TOM HANKS has been an actor, screenwriter, director and, through Playtone, a producer.  His writing has appeared in
The New York Times,
Vanity Fair, and
The New Yorker.  This is his first collection of fiction.

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 416
Erscheinungsdatum 17.10.2017
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-5247-1131-3
Verlag Penguin Random House
Maße (L/B/H) 19,8/12,8/3 cm
Gewicht 414 g

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"Some Stories"
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Landsberg am 14.11.2017
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Das Buch enthält 17 unterschiedliche Geschichten, die von dem sympathischen und sehr beliebten Schauspieler, Tom Hanks, erzählt werden. Kurzer Plot: Wie Tom Hanks in seinen Filmen mit verschieden Charakteren und Facetten spielt, tut er es auch in seinen Geschichten. Eine Rolle in jeder seiner Geschichten spielt die/eine... Das Buch enthält 17 unterschiedliche Geschichten, die von dem sympathischen und sehr beliebten Schauspieler, Tom Hanks, erzählt werden. Kurzer Plot: Wie Tom Hanks in seinen Filmen mit verschieden Charakteren und Facetten spielt, tut er es auch in seinen Geschichten. Eine Rolle in jeder seiner Geschichten spielt die/eine Schreibmaschine. Was man auf dem Cover vielleicht auch schon erahnen kann, und Fans wissen auch über seine "Sammelleidenschaft" für dieses Schreibgerät bescheid. Diese "Schreibmaschine" passt aber nicht immer zu der jeweilig erzählten Geschichte. Tom Hanks ist Amerikaner und das merkt man an seinem Schreibstil und an den Themen, die er aufgreift. Die Genren die er benutzt sind sehr vielseitig.... u. a. , ein Drehbuch, Zeitungskolumnen... sogar Science-Fiction... Mein Fazit: Die meisten "Stories" haben mir gut gefallen, und ich habe mich unterhalten gefühlt. 3. Sterne!

normal und doch ungewöhnlich - kurze Geschichten für lange Abende
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Kissing am 02.11.2017
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Seine Leidenschaft für Schreibmaschinen - Hanks besitzt über 250 davon - merkt man auch seinen Kurzgeschichten an, in jeder davon taucht ein Typewriter auf. Die Hauptdarsteller sind allerdings eindeutig Menschen, oft wirken sie zunächst wie der Typ von nebenan, die unauffällige Arbeitskollegin oder der Sitznachbar im Bus, aber l... Seine Leidenschaft für Schreibmaschinen - Hanks besitzt über 250 davon - merkt man auch seinen Kurzgeschichten an, in jeder davon taucht ein Typewriter auf. Die Hauptdarsteller sind allerdings eindeutig Menschen, oft wirken sie zunächst wie der Typ von nebenan, die unauffällige Arbeitskollegin oder der Sitznachbar im Bus, aber letzten Endes haben alle Protagonisten etwas Besonderes, sie sind eben "ungewöhnliche Typen". Die Themen erinnern oftmals an seine Filme, bei Weltraummissionen oder Szenarien des zweiten Weltkriegs bewegt sich Hanks auf ihm vertrauten Terrain. Dennoch gelingt es ihm, eine eigene Handschrift zu entwickeln. Für meinen Geschmack weisen die Short Stories lediglich manchmal eine etwas zu amerikanisch geprägte Sicht der Dinge auf. Dennoch gute Unterhaltung und Stoff für lange Diskussionen.


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  • A Month on Greene Street

    The first of August is usually only so notable-the start of the eighth month in the middle of summer on what might or might not be the hottest day ever. But this year, yowza, a lot was going on that day.

    Little Sharri Monk was sure to lose another tooth, a partial lunar eclipse was due around 9:15 p.m., and Bette Monk (mother of Sharri; her older sister, Dale; and her younger brother, Eddie) was moving them all into a three-bedroom house on Greene Street. The home so picturesque she knew she would live there the moment she saw the real estate listing. Bette had a vision-pop-of herself and the kids in the kitchen for a busy breakfast. She was manning the stove-top griddle, turning pancakes, the kids in school clothes finishing their homework and fighting over the last of the orange juice. Her mental image was so focused, so particular, there was no question the house on Greene Street-oh, that massive sycamore tree in the front yard-would be hers. Theirs.

    Bette had visions-was there any other way to put it? Not every day and never with any spiritual glow, but she would sense a flash, she'd see a pop, like a photo of a vacation taken long ago that held complete memories of all that happened before and all that came after. When her husband, Bob Monk, had come home from work one day-pop-Bette saw a full-color snapshot of him holding hands with Lorraine Conner-Smythe in the restaurant attached to the Mission Bell Marriott Hotel. Lorraine did consulting work with Bob's company, so the two of them had many chances to sniff each other out. In that nanosecond Bette knew her marriage with Bob had gone from just fine to over. Pop.

    If Bette were to count all the times she had such visions-from when she was a little girl-and how those visions came to pass, she could have regaled a dinner party for a full evening with examples: the scholarship she would win four years after learning of its existence, the dorm room she would have in Iowa City, the man she would sleep with for the first time (not Bob Monk), the wedding dress she would wear at the altar (opposite Bob Monk), the view of the Chicago River she would enjoy once the job interview with the Sun-Times went her way, the phone call she saw coming the night her parents were hit by a drunk driver. She knew the sexes of her children the moment she saw the test results over the sink in her bathroom. The list went on and on and on. Not that she made a big deal out of any of the visions, claiming no special clairvoyance or an all-seeing mentalism. Bette thought most people had the same kind of visions, they just didn't realize it. And not all of her visions came to pass. She once saw herself being a contestant on Jeopardy! but that never happened. Still, her accuracy ratio was awfully impressive.

    Bob wanted to marry Lorraine as soon as their affair was discovered, so he paid for the privilege, assuring Bette's financial security until the kids were off to college and the child support ceased. Buying the house on Greene Street required hoop jumping with the bank, glowing inspections, and a six-month escrow, but the deed was signed. The lawn, that sycamore, the front porch, all those bedrooms, and the minioffice attached to the garage made for a Promised Land, especially after the narrow, split-level condo in which she had first parked her money and where the four of them lived like kittens in a box, all on top of each other. Now they had a backyard, so deep and wide! With a pomegranate tree! Bette saw her kids-pop-in T-shirts covered in purple dribble spots come October!

    Greene Street was isolated, with almost no traffic except the residents, making it safe for street play. On August 1 the kids begged the movers to unload their bikes and Eddie's Big Wheel before anything else so they could cruise their new turf. The moving crew was a bunch of young Mexican guys who had kids of their own, so they were happy to oblige and t