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Games for Reading

Playful Ways to Help Your Child Read

HERE ARE OVER SEVENTY GAMES TO HELP YOUR CHILD LEARN TO READ--AND LOVE IT. Peggy Kaye's "Games for Reading helps children read by doing just what kids like best: playing games. There is a "bingo" game that helps children learn vocabulary. There is a rhyming game that helps them hear letter sounds more accurately. There are mazes and puzzles, games that train the eye to see patterns of letters, games that train the ear so a child can sound out words, games that awaken a child's imagination and creativity, and games that provide the right spark to fire a child's enthusiasm for reading. There are games in which your child has to act silly and games--sure to be any child's favorite--in which you do. Easy to follow and easy to play, these games are ideal for busy, working parents. You can read a game in a few minutes and start to play right away. You can play on car trips, while doing the laundry, or while cooking. These games are so much fun for the whole family that you may forget their serious purpose. But they will help "all beginning readers--those who have reading problems and those who do not--"learn to read and "want to read. "Games for Reading also includes a list of easy-to-read books and books for reading aloud, and a "Note to Teachers" on how to play these games in their classrooms.
Portrait
PEGGY KAYE has a master's degree in early childhood education from Columbia University's Teacher's College, and has taught reading at both public and private elementary schools in New York City.
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  • I N T R O D U C T I O N

     

    [ . . . ]

     

    There’s not set method for using
    Games for Reading. Some parents may play favorite games regularly. Other mothers and fathers will keep the book on a shelf until a rainy Saturday, then pull it out and play two or three games, just as something to do. Certain parents have the time and desire to prepare the game boards and special playing cards that some games require, and are happy to spend lots of energy over such games. Others will stick to games that require no preparation and can be enjoyed during car rides or while cooking supper. Whatever pattern fits your family is fine. And it’s not at all necessary to go through this book from beginning to end. You may start with Part One, but you can just as well begin with any of the other three. Feel free to move back and forth from one section to the next. As long as you pick out games that are fun for you and your child, you’ve made the right choices.

     

    Your child is likely to find one or another section harder than the others, depending on his special areas of strength and weakness. I had one student, Helena, who had no trouble sounding out words, but slowed down when it came to memorizing them. It didn’t surprise me that she found Part Two (sounding-out games) easy, and Part One (sight-vocabulary games) difficult. What to do with a child like this? Play both the hard games and the easy ones. The hard games work on a child’s weaknesses; the easy games build on strengths. That’s the best way to help any beginning reader.

     

    Occasionally I’ve indicated that a game shouldn’t be played until a child reaches second or third grade. Even if a child is doing advanced work in first grade, it’s still better to hold off on these particular games, in order to avoid possible conflict between the games’ methods and the specific techniques that your child’s teacher prefers for introducing new skills. But never worry that a child is too old for any game that he enjoys. Professional musicians practice scales, and children in the first three or four grades can benefit from even the simplest games. When a child has serious learning problems, games, although helpful, don’t constitute a cure-all. Children with serious problems need help from trained professionals. If your child is already receiving special help, you might ask his tutor or teacher to pick out appropriate games for you to play at home.

     

    There’s one important rule that applies to every part of this book. You must always remember how important you are to your child and how much he or she wants to impress you. Because of this your child may find it painful to fail in front of you. Your attitude toward mistakes, therefore, becomes crucial to the success of these games. If mistakes are fine with you, your child will have an easier time playing. You can help by being nice about it your child’s errors—for instance, by saying: “Oops, a mistake. Don’t worry, I make mistakes, too.” Or: “It’s OK to give the wrong answer. If you always knew the right answers, this game wouldn’t be fun any more.”

     

    And having fun is the key thing. If these games aren’t fun, they aren’t working. With each game, ask yourself if you and your child are having a good time. If the answer is no, try another game: there are lots of them. Or you may want to tinker with a set of rules to suit yourselves, or invent new games based on the ones here. Sometimes it’s worth trying a game again; your child may dislike a certain game today, yet love it tomorrow—or next year—and you may feel the same way. Some of the games call on you to do silly things or jump around the room. Tonight you may not feel up to that. But come Saturday morning, jumping around and acting silly may seem like a great idea—especially when you know it’s helping your child learn to read.
  • Acknowledgments • ix
    Introduction • xi

    PART ONE: Games for Learning Words • 1

    Chapter One: Words Everywhere • 2
    GIFT WORDS • 4
    POSTER WORDS • 6
    3-D WORDS • 8
    JUMBO WORDS • 10
    WORD COLLECTION BOX • 11
    WORD HUNT • 13
    CHARADE CARDS • 16
    PICTURE LABELS • 18
    LABEL THE HOUSE • 20
    BODY WORDS • 23

    Chapter Two: Games for the Eye • 24
    MAZES • 26
    JIGSAW PUZZLES • 30
    BLINDFOLD DRAWING • 33
    FIND IT • 35
    PICTURE MEMORY • 37
    HOW DO I LOOK? • 38
    SET THE TABLE • 39
    TWO DRAWING GAMES • 42
    A MUCH HARDER DRAWING GAME • 45
    LETTER CONTEST • 48
    SAME AND DIFFERENT • 50

    Chapter Three: Word Games • 52
    RAINBOW GAME • 53
    WORD LADDER • 55
    WORD CONCENTRATION • 58
    WORD BINGO • 61
    GOOFY SENTENCES • 64
    JIGSAW SENTENCES • 67
    ZIP CARDS • 72

    PART TWO: Games for Learning Sounds • 75

    Chapter Four: Games for the Ear • 76
    DO THIS, DO THAT • 78
    TALK A DRAWING • 80
    HARD LISTENING • 83
    WRONG-SPEED CONVERSATIONS • 84
    RHYMING GAMES • 85
    GAMES AND CHANTS • 87

    Chapter Five: Letter Sounds • 90
    CONSONANT BOX • 91
    WHERE'S THE SOUND? • 94
    PURPLE PENGUINS PICK APPLES • 96
    GRANDMOTHER'S TRUNK • 98
    ALPHABET WORDS • 100
    LINKING WORDS • 102
    CHICKENS AND WHALES • 103

    Chapter Six: Super Sounds Games • 109
    RABBIT SOUNDS • 110
    OOPS • 113
    SOUND TOSS • 115
    SOUND CHECKERS • 117

    Chapter Seven: Making Words • 122
    WORDS IN A BAG • 123
    PICK A BLEND • 126
    CHAIN GAME • 130
    MYSTERY WORDS • 131
    BACKWARDS • 133

    PART THREE: Games for Understanding • 135

    Chapter Eight: What Does That Mean? • 136
    SEE IT-NAME IT • 138
    GO-TO TOGETHERS • 140
    STORY WORDS • 142
    FRUMDIDDLE • 143
    MATCHES AND OPPOSITES • 144
    DICTIONARY READING • 146

    Chapter Nine: Making Sense • 147
    TAKING TURNS • 148
    MISTAKES • 150
    FINISH A FAIRY TALE • 152
    TV TALK • 154

    Chapter Ten: Imagination • 156
    CIRCLE STORY • 157
    CRAZY ANSWERS • 160
    TALL TALES OF YOUR DAY • 162
    GETTING TO KNOW YOU • 165
    PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS • 167
    INTERVIEW WITH AN ALLIGATOR • 170
    PICTURE STORIES • 173

    PART FOUR: Reading Every Day • 175

    Chapter Eleven: The Right Spark • 176
    READING ALOUD • 177
    COOKING • 179
    TREASURE HUNT • 183
    LUNCH-BOX MAIL • 184
    REAL MAIL • 186
    FAMILY CALENDAR • 187
    SCRAPBOOK COLLECTIONS • 189
    LITERARY LION • 193
    READING TOGETHER • 196

    Appendices • 199
    A LIST OF IMPORTANT WORDS • 200
    A LIST OF IMPORTANT SOUNDS • 203
    BOOKS FOR READING ALOUD • 204
    EASY READING BOOKS • 207
    CHILDREN'S MAGAZINES • 208
    A NOTE TO TEACHERS • 209
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Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 240
Erscheinungsdatum 01.06.1984
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-394-72149-1
Verlag Pantheon Schocken Books
Maße (L/B/H) 20,9/19,2/1,3 cm
Gewicht 508 g
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
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22,99
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