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12 Rules for Life

An Antidote to Chaos

#1 NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER 

“Jordan Peterson, has become one of the best-known Canadians of this generation. In the intellectual category, he’s easily the largest international phenomenon since Marshall McLuhan. . . . By combining knowledge of the past with a full-hearted optimism and a generous attitude toward his readers and listeners, Peterson generates an impressive level of intellectual firepower.” —Robert Fulford,
National Post

“Like the best intellectual polymaths, Peterson invites his readers to embark on their own intellectual, spiritual and ideological journeys into the many topics and disciplines he touches on. It’s a counter-intuitive strategy for a population hooked on the instant gratification of ideological conformity and social media ‘likes,’ but if Peterson is right, you have nothing to lose but your own misery.” —
Toronto Star


“In a different intellectual league. . . . Peterson can take the most difficult ideas and make them entertaining. This may be why his YouTube videos have had 35 million views. He is fast becoming the closest that academia has to a rock star.” —
The Observer

“Grow up and man up is the message from this rock-star psychologist. . . . [A] hardline self-help manual of self-reliance, good behaviour, self-betterment and individualism that probably reflects his childhood in rural Canada in the 1960s. As with all self-help manuals, there’s always a kernel of truth. Formerly a Harvard professor, now at the University of Toronto, Peterson retains that whiff of cowboy philosophy—one essay is a homily on doing one thing every day to improve yourself. Another, on bringing up little children to behave, is excellent…. [Peterson] twirls ideas around like a magician.” —Melanie Reid, 
The Times

“You don’t have to agree with [Peterson’s politics] to like this book for, once you discard the self-help label, it becomes fascinating. Peterson is brilliant on many subjects. . . . So what we have here is a baggy, aggressive, in-your-face, get-real book that, ultimately, is an attempt to lead us back to what Peterson sees as the true, the beautiful and the good—i.e. God. In the highest possible sense of the term, I suppose it is a self-help book. . . . Either way, it’s a rocky read, but nobody ever said God was easy.” —Bryan Appleyard,
The Times

“One of the most eclectic and stimulating public intellectuals at large today, fearless and impassioned.” —
The Guardian

“Someone with not only humanity and humour, but serious depth and substance. . . . Peterson has a truly cosmopolitan and omnivorous intellect, but one that recognizes that things need grounding in a home if they are ever going to be meaningfully grasped. . . . As well as being funny, there is a burning sincerity to the man which only the most withered cynic could suspect.” —
The Spectator

“Peterson has become a kind of secular prophet who, in an era of lobotomized conformism, thinks out of the box. . . . His message is overwhelmingly vital.” —Melanie Philips, 
The Times
Rezension
#1 NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER

"Like the best intellectual polymaths, Peterson invites his readers to embark on their own intellectual, spiritual and ideological journeys into the many topics and disciplines he touches on. It's a counter-intuitive strategy for a population hooked on the instant gratification of ideological conformity and social media 'likes,' but if Peterson is right, you have nothing to lose but your own misery." -Toronto Star

"In a different intellectual league. . . . Peterson can take the most difficult ideas and make them entertaining. This may be why his YouTube videos have had 35 million views. He is fast becoming the closest that academia has to a rock star." -The Observer

"Grow up and man up is the message from this rock-star psychologist. . . . [A] hardline self-help manual of self-reliance, good behaviour, self-betterment and individualism that probably reflects his childhood in rural Canada in the 1960s. As with all self-help manuals, there's always a kernel of truth. Formerly a Harvard professor, now at the University of Toronto, Peterson retains that whiff of cowboy philosophy-one essay is a homily on doing one thing every day to improve yourself. Another, on bringing up little children to behave, is excellent.... [Peterson] twirls ideas around like a magician." -Melanie Reid, The Times

"You don't have to agree with [Peterson's politics] to like this book for, once you discard the self-help label, it becomes fascinating. Peterson is brilliant on many subjects. . . . So what we have here is a baggy, aggressive, in-your-face, get-real book that, ultimately, is an attempt to lead us back to what Peterson sees as the true, the beautiful and the good-i.e. God. In the highest possible sense of the term, I suppose it is a self-help book. . . . Either way, it's a rocky read, but nobody ever said God was easy." -Bryan Appleyard, The Times

"One of the most eclectic and stimulating public intellectuals at large today, fearless and impassioned." -The Guardian

"Someone with not only humanity and humour, but serious depth and substance. . . . Peterson has a truly cosmopolitan and omnivorous intellect, but one that recognizes that things need grounding in a home if they are ever going to be meaningfully grasped. . . . As well as being funny, there is a burning sincerity to the man which only the most withered cynic could suspect." -The Spectator

"Peterson has become a kind of secular prophet who, in an era of lobotomized conformism, thinks out of the box. . . . His message is overwhelmingly vital." -Melanie Philips, The Times
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  • A RELIGIOUS PROBLEM
    It does not seem reasonable to describe the young man who shot twenty children and six staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012 as a religious person. This is equally true for the Colorado theatre gunman and the Columbine High School killers. But these murderous individuals had a problem with reality that existed at a religious depth. As one of the members of the Columbine duo wrote:

    "The human race isn't worth fighting for, only worth killing. Give the Earth back to the animals. They deserve it infinitely more than we do. Nothing means anything anymore."

    People who think such things view Being itself as inequitable and harsh to the point of corruption, and human Being, in particular, as contemptible. They appoint themselves supreme adjudicators of reality and find it wanting. They are the ultimate critics. The deeply cynical writer continues:

    "If you recall your history, the Nazis came up with a 'final solution' to the Jewish problem. . . . Kill them all. Well, in case you haven't figured it out, I say 'KILL MANKIND.' No one should survive."

    For such individuals, the world of experience is insufficient and evil-so to hell with everything!

    What is happening when someone comes to think in this manner? A great German play, Faust: A Tragedy, written by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, addresses that issue. The play's main character, a scholar named Heinrich Faust, trades his immortal soul to the devil, Mephistopheles. In return, he receives whatever he desires while still alive on Earth. In Goethe's play, Mephistopheles is the eternal adversary of Being. He has a central, defining credo:

    "I am the spirit who negates
    and rightly so, for all that comes to be
    deserves to perish, wretchedly.
    It were better nothing would begin!
    Thus everything that your terms sin,
    destruction, evil represent-
    that is my proper element."

    Goethe considered this hateful sentiment so important-so key to the central element of vengeful human destructiveness-that he had Mephistopheles say it a second time, phrased somewhat differently, in Part II of the play, written many years later.

    People think often in the Mephistophelean manner, although they seldom act upon their thoughts as brutally as the mass murderers of school, college and theatre. Whenever we experience injustice, real or imagined; whenever we encounter tragedy or fall prey to the machinations of others; whenever we experience the horror and pain of our own apparently arbitrary limitations-the temptation to question Being and then to curse it rises foully from the darkness. Why must innocent people suffer so terribly? What kind of bloody, horrible planet is this, anyway?

    Life is in truth very hard. Everyone is destined for pain and slated for destruction. Sometimes suffering is clearly the result of a personal fault such as willful blindness, poor decision-making or malevolence. In such cases, when it appears to be self-inflicted, it may even seem just. People get what they deserve, you might contend. That's cold comfort, however, even when true. Sometimes, if those who are suffering changed their behaviour, then their lives would unfold less tragically. But human control is limited. Susceptibility to despair, disease, aging and death is universal. In the final analysis, we do not appear to be the architects of our own fragility. Whose fault is it, then?

    People who are very ill (or, worse, who have a sick child) will inevitably find themselves asking this question, whether they are religious believers or not. The same is true of someone who finds his shirtsleeve caught in the gears of a giant bureaucracy-who is suffering through a tax audit, or fighting an interminable lawsuit or divorce. And it's not only the obviously suffering who are tormented by the need to blame someone or something for the intolerable state of their Being. At the
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 448
Erscheinungsdatum 23.01.2018
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-345-81602-3
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 23,9/16,3/4,3 cm
Gewicht 660 g
Illustrator Ethan van Scriver
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
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bisher 14,99
Sie sparen : 8  %
13,79
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Sie sparen : 8 %

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von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Durbach am 30.10.2018

Habe kürzlich einen Vortrag von Dr. Peterson in Manchester sehen dürfen. Ein wahrlich einzigartiger Mensch der auch auf der Bühne durch gelebte Gestik versucht, seine Gedanken immer neu zu fassen. Sein Buch reflektiert nicht nur seine eigenen Erfahrungen, vor allem in seinem Leben als Vater einer kranken Tochter, sondern auch di... Habe kürzlich einen Vortrag von Dr. Peterson in Manchester sehen dürfen. Ein wahrlich einzigartiger Mensch der auch auf der Bühne durch gelebte Gestik versucht, seine Gedanken immer neu zu fassen. Sein Buch reflektiert nicht nur seine eigenen Erfahrungen, vor allem in seinem Leben als Vater einer kranken Tochter, sondern auch die Erfahrungen seiner vielen Kunden. Peterson ist nicht nur eine Youtube Prominenz welche keine Scheu davor macht sich gegen die verhärtete, extreme Linke zu stellen, sondern auch ein sehr emphatischer und aufmerksamer Mann in einer gefährlichen Welt. In seinem neuesten Buch schafft er es, seine Regeln spannend und gekonnt an seine Leserschaft zu vermitteln. Wirklich sehr empfehlenswert für den, der noch nicht zufrieden ist sowie für den der bereit ist seine Sichten in frage gestellt zu sehen. "Compare yourself to who you where yesterday, not to who someone else is today."


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